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20121010
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to seem unless the debate set the presidential election. it's clear the spt heading toward a environment he has a advantage. romney is going to be exceptional. >> tune in. >> fiewn in and watch. let watch. >> i'm excited. >> talk about in next week in class. >> would you taunt the cross road different and you engage in more localized races congressional and senate how you choose your priorities since so you have a broader scope. >> yeah. that's a good question. we're focused on the presidential election and goal to beat president obama and elect a new president. we are heavily invested in the senate and house race. thing a way about the -- [inaudible] i don't think priority u.s.a. for example -- restore future exclusively dedicated. we're focused on all of the senate races or where you're going do see a lot more of the advertising early your on in the senate races, the bigger the office, the more people pay attention. the we'll be engaged in a number of house races probably a little bit later as we get closer. >> yeah. that's the other thing. the cross roads place outside role in the sen
, it created a lot of debt we have to pay off. that's kind of our messaging. we try to hold elected officials to account for the record and also for the promises they have made. that's why a lot of incumbents don't like super pacs. >> we have an important note. one of the things we talk about is targeting. living here between new york and philadelphia media market you're not going to see any of these most likely. potentially pennsylvania has been a target state. neither campaign or the super pacs advertising in in sylvania. it's the most expensive market in the target states. i think it's also important to remember, there's a lot of money that is concentrated to a very small number of states and ultimately a small number of people as well. that's something i think is very important. a big part campaign finance reform and the unintended consequences. that's what my pet peeves is the unintended consequences sometimes as well intended legislation. we want to open up to questions. we will give maggie a chance to respond but i didn't want to become the moderator but somehow that may happen. but we
that separation? another question that's obvious to raise, especially with an election coming up, is in this any way to cover an election? it's a really good question, and i'm sure the session will spark good conversations, and i hope it will give us some good ideas as well. this looks like a fascinating program, and we're very, very proud to host it. thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> thank you very much. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint
will have, and, in fact, i welcome. a this is, we're told, the most i important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, o 2004, and 2000 or other 2 elections when00 that is regulay said. e for this to be true, though, among other things, elections must, in fact, be desicive with gene knew win consequences for the making of public policy, d particularly, with regard to domestic policy. we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regardea to foreign policy military policy, but let me say myto primary interest in the book ant in remarks this evening is much more domestic policy and the extent to which elections do ore do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic policy.es for the older members in this audience, there has been at t least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago when all of the stars were aligned, not only to create a landslide victory for johnson, after, all, richard nixon got a victory in 1972, but a lands
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
you will have, in fact, that i welcome. this is, we're told, the most important election in our lifetimes, and it may be that more people believe that this year than believed it in 2008, 2004 and 2000 or other elections when that is regularly said. for this to be true, though, among other things elections must, in fact, be decisive, with genuine consequences for the making of public policy particularly with regard to domestic policy. um, we could have a separate conversation about the issue of presidential power with regard to foreign policy, military policy. but let me say that my primary interest in the book and in my remarks this evening is much more domestic policy, and can the extent to which elections do or do not bring us close to resolving important issues of domestic public policy. for the older members in this audience, there has been at least one election that did fundamentally change america, and that is 1964, a mere 48 years ago. when all of the stars were aligned not only to create a landslide victory for president lyndon johnson -- after all, richard nixon got a l
facing a third party candidate in the 2012 election. then live coverage from denver, colorado, for a campaign rally with republican presidential candidate mitt romney. later, president obama rallies with supporters in las vegas. >> tuesday british labour party leader ed miliband delivers remarks in manchester. we'll have live coverage from england here on c-span2 starting at 9:15 a.m. eastern. also tuesday on c-span2, a look at what happens to individual taxes if the bush era tax cuts expire. former congressional budget office director douglas holtz-eakin and other economists look at the issue. our live coverage from the urban institute here in washington, d.c. starts at noon eastern. >> every generation through our history has worked and sacrificed to leave a better country to their children and grandchildren and future generations. we, we were then spending their money, we are now even more, much more, spending their money, and we are leaving them a mess that will be a very difficult to deal with, and if we are that weak, just think of who wants to come here first and take u
won't say yeah, we are right even in the best political climate after an election everyone is trying to be nice they can't make progress at the policy is so toxic they are not going to do with the problem. still downgrade. as we have to move past 2013 no matter what. you don't need causing the recession a threat to force us to move. in fact it is irresponsible to have the recession so we should get past the fiscal cliff, extend the ceiling and get to the fundamentals in this grand bargain that will for ever get rid of the fiscal cliff and have a tax code and get rid of the sequestered because we know what the plan will be and that is the best way to go. >> so, the way we got here to the fiscal cliff is a bunch of the cans kept getting kicked down the road and happened to land right in front of us now at the end of december. if you look at cbo office of the fiscal plan if you notice the scary part is the pile of cans that happen to be in front of us right now. there's a good part of the cliff though and that is the part that stretches on throughout the rest of the ten year budget wind
to the scene in phoenix in 1960's during the election when william rehnquist was interviewing with voters and brosnahan said look -- he was a very well-known and respected lawyer by thin in san francisco and brosnahan said i was there and i was the fbi agent on the scene. i positively identify him as the man. discouraging black voters. rehnquist was giving them a literacy test and which was not illegal but it was, but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that was not made. >> host: kind of a case of mistaken identity so james brosnahan comes to washington and puts a lot on the line. >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really just kind it gets hammered because in the end he is not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it. it's just not me and that was very i thought, very typical i think of when i met with rehnquist's 10 years later. very very typical of the way that he carried a question that he did not want to a
in the 1960s during the election when william rehnquist was interfering with voters. and brosnahan said, look, he was a very well known and respected lawyer by then in san francisco. and buzz han said, i was there, i was the fbi agent on the -- >> host: who was discouraging black voters. >> guest: rehnquist was giving them a literacy test. >> host: right. >> guest: and, um, which was not illegal, but it was -- but he was really pushing the line to the point where the police and the fbi had to be called to restore order. and rehnquist simply said, that not me. >> host: kind of a mistaken identity. >> guest: case of mistaken identity. >> host: so james brosnahan comes to washington, puts a lot on the line -- >> guest: puts a lot on the line and really gets hammered because in the end he's not left with anything that really he can grab onto to come back at rehnquist. rehnquist simply says i just can't explain it, t just not me -- it's just not me. and that was very, very, i thought, cagey. it was very typical, i thought, when i met with rehnquist ten years later, um, very, very typical of the wa
. and an incredible, beautiful environment and also in an interesting election season to say the least. our first award for the evening -- before we get to that, i have to start it was a joke. can i start out with a joke? joe biden. sorry, that's the joke. [applause] followed by another joke, nancy pelosi. sorry. as an ardent practicing catholic. sorry. i was told by friends of "saturday night live" but i do the best nancy pelosi impersonation, but i'm still waiting for that bet they are going to me and "saturday night live." he seemed to avoid goofy liberal spirits on the republicans they do over there. our first award to the evening is the obama got some award. i can't believe i'm actually saying that. troubling. for about 25 years come in the media research center has been documenting every idiocy we know from the media as they celebrate one liberal hero after another. and let me just say, the people we are going to be talking about, they love politicians who want to raise your taxes, right? they love politicians who want to expand the nanny state and are going to check all the boxes here. the
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11